Attorney-General's Department South Australia

Also known as
  • Director of Public Prosecutions, Office of the DPP
  • State Records SA
  • South Australia Classification Council
  • Independent Gambling Authority
  • Public Trustee SA
  • Forensic Science SA
  • Public Advocate Office Of
  • Equal Opportunity Commission
  • Justice Of The Peace Services
  • Crown Solicitor's Office
  • Commissioner For Victims' Rights
  • Discrimination - Equal Opportunity Commission
  • Fines Enforcement and Recovery Unit
  • Consumer and Business Services
  • Safework SA
  • South Australian Civil and Administrative Tribunal

Adelaide


Level 12, Gpo Exchange, 10 Franklin Street, Adelaide SA 5000

Business Summary
The Attorney-General’s Department (AGD) promotes justice by protecting the rights of all South Australians, holding people to account according to the law, improving safety, and contributing to an efficient and fair justice system.
About Us
The Attorney-General’s Department (AGD) promotes justice by protecting the rights of all South Australians, holding people to account according to the law, improving safety, and contributing to an efficient and fair justice system.

AGD delivers legal infrastructure for South Australia that is just, equitable and robust, with a focus on prevention. We promote fair, timely and economical access to justice by providing legal, civil, prosecutorial and legislative services to the community, ministers and agencies across government, as well as specialist policy advice.

We foster community safety and wellbeing by advocating for and protecting the rights of individuals, particularly the most vulnerable, and promoting cultural diversity and equality.

AGD also has regulatory and compliance functions. We work with businesses and provide services direct to the public to achieve better compliance and promote a fair, secure and balanced marketplace, where consumers are protected and know their rights.

AGD supports the work of independent offices, including, the Equal Opportunity Commissioner and the Commissioner for Victims’ Rights, while also supporting the Minister for Emergency Services and Minister for Police through the South Australian Computer Aided Dispatch, South Australian Government Radio Network (SAGRN) and the State Rescue Helicopter Service.

What We Do

The Attorney-General is the state’s principal legal advisor to the government and responsible for the administration of justice. The Attorney-General is a member of Cabinet and responsible for:

  • specific legislation and the state's legal system
  • developing and implementing policy
  • legal action relevant to the state government.

The Attorney-General is unable to comment on decisions or matters presented in court and does not provide legal advice to members of the public.

Find a Justice of the Peace

Forensic Science SA

Crime and justice data

Crown Solicitor’s Office


FAQs
What is the role of the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions?
The Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (ODPP) prosecutes those offences committed against the laws of the State of South Australia that are tried in the District or Supreme Court. The ODDP also prosecutes offences of a sensitive nature or complexity in the Youth Court and the Magistrates Court. The Office is independent and was established under the Director of Public Prosecutions Act 1991. It is made up of lawyers, witness assistance officers and administrative staff.
What is the role of police in prosecutions?
Police begin criminal proceedings following an investigation. When police charge a person with a serious criminal offence, they refer it to the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (ODPP) to prosecute. The ODPP relies on information provided by police. Less serious offences, known as ‘summary offences’, usually are prosecuted by police in the Magistrates Court. The ODPP can prosecute a summary matter where the complexity or sensitivity warrants it.
Does the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions act as the legal representative for a victim of a crime?
No. The Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (ODPP) is an independent prosecuting agency. It acts in the best interests of the State as a whole. The ODPP determines the charges to be heard and conducts the prosecution. The ODPP recognises the special place of victims in the criminal justice system and takes into account their views when making decisions on prosecutions.
As a victim of crime do I have to pay for the lawyer involved in my case?
No. Lawyers in the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions do not represent the victim of a crime. They are government employees who conduct prosecutions on behalf of the State.
What is the difference between a solicitor and a prosecutor?
A solicitor is a lawyer who prepares a matter for trial or for a plea. A solicitor also will appear in court for pre-trial hearings up to the point of trial. A prosecutor is a lawyer who appears as counsel at the trial. It is possible to be both a solicitor and a prosecutor. Both are employees who represent the State.
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